Tom Kibasi, Director, IPPR

Tom is responsible for IPPR’s overall direction, its networks and leadership of its staff and programme of work.

Prior to joining IPPR in early 2016, Tom spent more than a decade at McKinsey and Company, where he was a partner and held leadership roles in the healthcare practice in both London and New York. Tom led McKinsey’s work on healthcare innovation and financing, presenting at the World Economic Forum in Davos, to the OECD in Paris, and to the World Bank in Washington. Together with Duke University, Tom helped to launch the non-profit ‘Innovations in Healthcare’, which works with social entrepreneurs around the world. He has published in The Lancet on medical education and in the Washington Post, where he defended the NHS during the debate on US healthcare reform.

Tom has helped governments with healthcare reform in more than a dozen countries across five continents, working with health secretaries, prime ministers, and heads of state. He has also served international institutions, such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, TB and Malaria, and international foundations including the Rockefeller Foundation and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. During his time based in New York City, Tom supported US state governments to implement innovations to expand coverage and improve the quality and accessibility of care as a result of the Affordable Care Act (‘Obamacare’).

Tom previously worked at the UK Department of Health, where he was policy adviser to Professor Lord Darzi, who described Tom as the ‘policy architect’ of his acclaimed NHS review High Quality Care for All, published in 2008. Tom was subsequently appointed an honorary lecturer at Imperial College. In 2014, Tom supported the London Health Commission with its report Better Health for London, produced for then-mayor Boris Johnson. Tom was educated at Trinity College, Cambridge, where he studied history. He grew up in north London, and now lives in Kennington in south-east London.

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